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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)
american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consum
have 16,000 of them. we have about 54,000 drinking water systems. narrator: issues facing new york city are very different from those in los angeles. and challenges facing small towns are very different from those in metropolitan areas. man: we have to have water supply for health purposes, for fire protection, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public hea
of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the v
for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandhog for 37 years. narrator: sandhogs are the men of local 147, who work deep below the city. they began building the infrastructure of new york in 1872. from the subways to the sewers, the water tunnels to the highway tunnels, new york city thrives because of their work. ryan: you got one little hole in the ground, and nobody knows we're here. see the empire state building, right. that's 1,000 feet. so you figure, yo
. he moved to new york city in 1948, where benny goodman hire him and he became very famous in new york at the time and he died in new york in 2001. one of the pieces of my ticket to ride is how many cubans of irish ancestry are there. because this connected to my family, that's why i wanted to read it to you. in the 40's, my father moved to new york in search of his destiny. he learned to make brillantine in red, blue and golden colors to give a beautiful sheen to the hair. in his spare time, when he could break free from his alchemist's captive vit, he would go listen to cuban music at the park plaza hotel in manhattan. those were happy times and years later became a happy tomic with me, convinced early on that my father inhabited a magic world. a few years ago, while listening to a recording of cuban blues by chico, i remembered in new york in those stories of the 40's that chico and my father met at club cuba in manhattan and again in havana in the mid-50's. the sessions of chico's house in our neighborhood became so famous that even my father, not particularly fond of cuban jazz, c
in 1853 in response to a freight elevator accident in new york city. until that time, elevators were quite common in buildings but typically used just for handling freight. elisha otis -- elijah otis successfully demonstrated the safety device he had created. even of the elevator and he cut the device, and he did not fall. everyone was impressed by that. in 1857, the oldest brother's company installed their first passenger elevator on broadway in new york. believe it or not, many of those first elevators were actually started and stopped by a hand broke. >> what drove those old elevators? what was their motive power? >> in some cases, they might have even been hp. >> and then changed to electric? >> electric cited to come in the 1890's, and that was around the time when the elevator stopped from material handling and started to be used more frequently for passengers. in 1878, there was a demonstration of the other thing that allowed architects to build taller buildings was the advent of a higher quality steel manufacturing. in 19003, the first production year track models were introduced,
new york city -- the mayor did endorse utilizing companies in the sharing space. i am really excited to be here tonight working with the mayor's office because i think it is a tremendous step in the right direction. and the fact that so many collaborative consumption companies are born here. we, as a city, should really be the leadership model in the space. >> i think, for us, there are currently right now less direct regulatory concerns, but i imagine more will emerge. i think that legitimacy and credibility to create programs that the city can actually sanction these types of businesses because we are not 84 provider. our providers are not for operators. they are individuals leveraging a platform. really looking at those nuances, but also finding a way to make this credible. i think trust is a big issue in our community, and for people to understand the you do not have to use the hotel concierge or go on a doctor or to be safe in san francisco. >> i think our city leadership has learned quite a bit through this panel and through the previous discussion. for me, -- and i think for t
association of transportation regulars conference last week and i heard the city of new york is planning on issuing a request a proposal for drivers healthcare. in order to increase the level of coverage. i want to talk to new york city and other jurisdictions about leveraging multiple cities populations of taxi drivers to bring rates down and provide health care for san francisco taxi drivers. >> chairman nolan: what is the rate at which the fund is growing? >> we started a pilot program, approximately 1 million dollars a year. we started the pilot program in late 2010. i cannot say with any accuracy what would happen when old medallions become transferable. that is what is happening now. >> chairman nolan: i am interested in that. that would be a wonderful thing to be able to do that. mr. -- point about being at a level, middle level, i would be interested in seeing that. >> a lot of the cabdrivers have talked about sort of the other challenges that they face in their industry, corruption may be within the cap companies, maybe with non-driving drivers holding the down is requi
, new york city, portland, san francisco, and seattle, with several more markets to come. under her leadership, it was named one of the next big things in tech by the wall street journal, the start up to watch by ink magazine. please welcome leah. jamie wong is the co-founder and ceo of viable.com. her vision of a more open world and exchanges through travel is the driving force. her commitment to bringing travel experiences to the world by making it easier to find, create, and book provides a platform for the community. she is a dynamic creative and leader with a passion for bringing ideas to market the change the way people live. finally, jay. in his girl as the chief innovation officer, he is working with the tech community and public to bring the government into the digital age. a partnership announced in 2012 will open the doors of government to our tech community to drive new solutions and businesses. if you have ideas for innovating services for government, please send him a tweet. finally, our moderator. he is the co-founder and publisher of an online magazine. i will let hi
in petaluma. the u.s. coast guard is a service of less than 50,000, the size of a new york city police department. the public safety and security are always major concerns for the coast guard. while some coast guard men and men will celebrate in fleet week, most will be on duty performing their job protecting the public, and the environment in and around san francisco. with partnership with state and local partners. we recognize the services of the fleet week members, past and present. ladies and gentlemen, you will witness sailors and marines on the decks of their ship in their uniforms. this is manning the rails and one of the oldest traditions from hundreds of years ago. today members are stationed along the rail to honor ceremonies. the most common is visiting a port not recently visitd and home, departing for or returning from a visit. this started in 1908 when the great white fleet visited this city. in 1981, dyane finestein started fleet week. it remains a grand celebration with the parade of ships. today, san francisco fleet week serves as a mechanism for urban preparedness and
the regulations in new york city. that is another market we're in. we're looking forward to allowing san francisco to lead the way by showing the impact our platform can have. we are also really concerned with the tax issue as well. so far, the tax code is really segmented largely for personal and business taxes. the sharing economy presents a nuanced situation. individuals are not businesses but are enjoying a new stream of income. we are interested in having that conversation in a way where we can use the new economy to benefit the city as well as individuals who are proactively taking all entrepreneurship in their own hands to leverage their own resources and knowledge to supplement their income. >> at task rabbit, we're looking to partner with the city and generate more awareness around what we do and how consumers and small businesses can get involved. we have a lot of small businesses utilizing the network as a delivery force or on demand labor force, particularly with seasonal businesses. they do not want to have to hire a bunch of full-time employees for a month or two of work. they're abl
anything we're have to rethink what we're doing. everybody points to new york city as an example of what is right with the cab industry. you have an area half of the size of san francisco. you have 10 times the number of cabs. i was there in may and i took a lot of cabs and i always talk to the drivers and they average about $27,000 a year because the medallions are out of the range of them afford one. they work long hours. it's a great town to get a cab in but a bad town to drive a taxi in. i was asked twice where are we going? we're going to tenth and 40th and you don't know how to get there. that's horrible and if they take the medallions and give them to the company over time this is a [inaudible] dollar an hour of job and 20 years from now when everyone is wondering what happened to the cab industry and you guys are our only hob at the moment and we're asking to you take a look at this. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> ladies and gentlemen, good evening. my name is ms. macary and have been driving 33 years in san francisco, and i have a question for you guys. this cab
worked. he has ben in new york city, washington d.c., he has been in los angeles. probably the most interesting for me was the fact that he was in philadelphia for a number of years. we know in the department of aging and adult services that philadelphia has one of the most interesting and creative network of services for older adults in the country. it is really accessible to older adults. some of the most creative work we have seen at around the country. dave is also on the board of several civic organizations including the challengers boys and girls club, and cure autism now. edave -- dave, take it away. >> and good morning, can you hear me? in the back, can you hear me? i can see you. good morning, and thank you very much. if no one told you this morning, you look good today. you really do look good. in fact, you look just like i thought you would look on tv. i thank god for the opportunity to be with you for this very important conference. this is big. this is important. one of the things that she did not tell you about me that a lot of people don't know, not that you have to c
in or leaving new york city and i had the book and had martinis and we read the book together and you loved one line "female criminals can be unwidely uncunning" and we had that conversation about why airportings never have clocks and after that i saw you two times and more sorrow and the first is when you family were in the gold country and i met you there before we went back to our house. although it was summer rain pored all day long. the pewter sky was inseparable from the horizon and you my brother and by that time were also becoming inseparable from the horizons of your illness and the line between you it and were blurring. it was during that first visit i understood that you would die and not eventually but sooner than that you. you were in a wheel care and -- chair and we waited while abbey and the boys got the care. it's the first time we were alone together. as the rain drummed i turned to you and saw that you were crying, crying silently not moving and i reflected then how curious it was before i never seen a person cry in this alarming manner silently and letsing the tears
to make a change that is this radical, -- new york city as i understand it file piling one project on city land to see how it works this is not one the 375 units, we are talking about four-six projects and i might say it might really help not with affordable housing but with moderate mousing and i think that is scott wieners place on this and i think it might help but i think so it will open up a whole a lot of loopholes and i think we should go slowly and so one thing that we learned during the presidential campaign is the problem of math and so one thing that i would like to propose propose to you is the mathematical campaign so you divide in a by 30 days and what that comes out to is $50 a night i. simple math. if you think about that,that is pretty cheap per night and now imagine for a moment, here we go. so $1,500 a month works out to $50 a night and let's say that you charge $99 a night it's a teen hundred dollars and then 4,000 a month. and so now, you are holding one of these buildings and trying to figure out what do to satisfy your investors there will be a tremendous incentiv
would love if san francisco could look like new york city does now and landscape but we don't have the political will to do that and we need to do second best and focus on two things. one, many of the homeless have mental illness issues and we need to make sure they get their meds and support laura's law and show compassion but if people are a threat to themselves and others they need to take the meds and second it's us. we in society cannot be enablers and come to san francisco and we are well intentioned and we will solve all of the problems and we can't broke with our resources and these are issues in all of society and we need to take care of our residents first. >> all right. thank you all. our next question, how would you make the streets safer for pedestrian especially on 19th avenue. ms. gavin, let's begin with you. >> well, that's a very interesting questions because 19th avenue i think is highway one and it's owned by cal trans and unfortunately there have been some horrific accidents there. i think that -- one of the things i am aware of even in the downtown area --
in new york city that is undergoing significant development. so, i have all of the same concerns in the area where i live and i take them very seriously and so do we all. but we are trying to create a situation that will alleviate those fears and concerns and at the same time provide economic development and job growth for the neighborhood for the city and the region. we're focused on making this a place where families and other people of the neighborhood and the city can enjoy themselves. and the space that is today a surface parking lot of about three acres in a degrading concrete pier. this is something we all feel we can only improve the quality of life, the property and social values of the neighborhood as we take the concerns of those nearby to heart. thank you very much. >> thank you, mr. dikers. i actually just had a couple of comments, more comments than questions. i just want to express -- by the way, thank you so much for the presentation. the design is beautiful, and i thank the comments and feedback that we got. there is general consensus that it was presented to the
, commissioner, if you feel differently. new york city i just wanted to know if you were vetting all five or the three in yellow. so, we're doing the three in yellow? >> yes. >> i would vet we do the three in yellow and come back next month -- >> final recommendation. we'd be happy to do that. >> so, is this an action item? >> no. >> okay, all right. thank you so much. once again, thanks for all of your help and efficiency. i know you have very little work to do over there. [laughter] >> i would just want to add, as we look at our matrix for vetting folks, i would also like to know about their staff. our mayor has just negotiated a wonderful relationship with the warriors coming to do business in our town. we'd like to know how people are going to play our folks as they do business in our town. so, i'd like to have that as part of what gets laid out. >> both in terms of who is going to be assigned, who is going to be their back office, how that works, who that gets let out to. so on and so forth. thank you. next. >> do we have any public comment on item number 5? >>> commissioners, henry
-- we all just saw what happened in new york city and on the eastern coast of new jersey because of global warming. we need to get rid of so much parking. this is excessive parking. i'm concerned about the levels of affordability in the building. i don't know what they are. are the units affordable, but i can speak more specifically to the parking. are there levels of parking underground, uh-uh, that's got to go. thank you. >> is there additional public comment on this item? okay, seeing none, the public comment portion is closed. opening up to commissioners. commissioner antonini. >> i think this is an excellent project for a lot of reasons that have already been brought up. pointed out the siting in such a way to allow access to oscar park, allow light and air into a whole area of the city. i think that's extremely well done. there was one comment made by a commenter that they don't see the cumulative appearance, but architect has done a very good job of our materials put on the screen and showing what the skyline would look like with all the buildings in place that are those t
in parks all over the country, is it true. on a yalerly basis from new york to the bay down to a city called l.a. over to dallas and new orleans is it true. up to aspen and boulder too. i see many, many children every year, you see. i always can't wait back to my home by the bay. yes, i think our parks are number one, by the way. i'm here to talk about the holidays, is it true. once again it is the time of year for the elves to arrive in union square two. i will be there, yes, sir, siree. i hope to see all of your smiling faces, you see. >> thank you. >> is there anyone else who would like to make general public comment? being none, general public comment is closed. we are on item five, the consent calendar. is there anyone who would like to make public comment on the consent calendar. richard, please come forward. >>> good morning again. i was looking over at the betty republican radiation center. i took liberty of going out there, looking around, seeing location. i talked to a facilitator there. they seem to have a little problem with the setup, where they are going to be going into
cory booker from new ark and hif a applause and support his city with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> my name is byron webb. i'm a development director with the port and i want to welcome to heron park. it was built in the wetlands in the bay view community adjacent to the indian basin. it is approximately 22-acres and we are here to celebrate the expansion of the wetlands and also the creation of the first bidirectional bike way in the city and in this neighborhood. with that brief introduction -- the reason that we're here i wanted to introduce the mayor and have him speak to these two important projects for this bay view community. [applause] >> thank you brian. i k
johnson from sacramento, mayor cory booker from new ark and hif a applause and support his city with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> hello, my name is jamie harper. in this episode, we are featuring the park locations in your very own backyard. this is your chance to find your heart in san francisco with someone special. golden gate park's largest body of water is this lake, a popular spot for strolling and paddling around in boats, which can be rented. created in 1893, it was designed foreboding and -- for boating. it is named for the wild strawberries that once flores. a pleasant trail follows the perimeter past huntington falls, 110 foot waterfall. two bridges connect th
city with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> good morning everyone. thank you very much for coming. i am jennifer mats. i am the mayor's director of work force development and i welcome you here today for an unprecedented jobs announcement between golden state golden state warriors and community advocates here in san francisco. without further adieu i would like to introduce our mayor ed lee. >> thank you jennifer. good morning everyone. today is a pretty good announcement of another milestone that we have reached with the golden state warriors but before i say that i want to continue thanking the people who are very interested in the city of this city, the future of sports,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)